How do you afford adventures?

Expeditions do not have to cost a lot of money. We now live in a world where the cost of a flight is very reasonable and the internet opens doors for numerous ways of fundraising.

Okay I'm not in denial, the larger expeditions do cost a lot. Anywhere like the Arctic or high altitude mountains require an awful lot of kit and some pricey insurance. These take time to save and fundraise but it is, just like everything else, all possible if you want it bad enough. There's crowdfunding and trusts that can all help get you the pennies for the bigger trips.

So excluding those kind of adventures, the others can be done on just a few hundred quid. I've recently found myself going on adventures with a smaller price tag whilst I save and plan for the bigger ones. 

In the last 18 months, the cheap adventures I have been on are as follows: Walking across Spain (on my own route, not the camino), trekking in Scotland (45 miles per day!), the GR20; the long distance scramble across the whole of Corsica and finally, and epic adventure in Iceland.

It doesn't take a lot of money to have some great adventures. Nor does it take a lot of time for some. I am very aware that with a full time job and a family, it's not as easy to get out for months at a time. However, for a dose of the outside, a 40 minute train ride out of London and you're out of the city and into the countryside. Take along some mates,  a sleeping and a bivvy bag, a field somewhere and you're set for a night in the semi-wild! Alastair Humphreys is the expert on Micro Adventures. See what he has to say on these type of adventures here

What I'm talking about is somewhere in-between a micro adventure and an epic long haul expedition.

Getting there

Living in the UK means we have easy access to the Alps, the Pyrenees and the Atlas mountains. So that's cheap transport covered. 

Food

Next is food. Planning is the best way to make food on adventures as cheap as possible. See if there are cheap supermarkets where you begin your adventure or take it with you in the first place.

Route

Research, learn and apply. The great thing about having experience and knowledge of the wilderness is that you  don't need to pay for guides. Obviously this can't always be the case for safety reasons but when you are able to guide yourself or go with friends who are more experienced than you, it'll save heaps of cash. 

Kit

Warmer destinations require less specialised kit. I have to admit I've accumulated kit for a huge range of adventures now but admittedly it has taken years.

I've got a low cost but exciting and wild adventure planned very soon. Flights were £50 return, I'm going somewhere I've never been before and spending a lot of time planning and researching the area to get the most out of the environment I'm heading to.

The hardest thing is always deciding where you're heading and then committing. Commit and you've already began your journey!